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What to Do with A Car With a Cracked Engine Block

Marc Skirvin
Marc Skirvin

Table of Contents

While it’s pretty rare for you to encounter a cracked engine block or a blown head gasket with your car, they could still happen and when they do, it could result in a serious engine problem.  Your vehicle’s engine block is built to be durable and it can handle extreme heat or cold but there may be circumstances that could lead to some cracks in your engine block.

Excessive heat, for one, can cause a cracked engine block. This could happen if there’s a lack of coolant which may be because of a leaky head gasket. Your car could indeed keep sputtering along for countless miles even with a cracked engine block but know that a complete engine failure will definitely happen.

In this post, Cash Auto Salvage, one of the trusted auto salvage yards in Fort Worth tells you about the signs of a cracked engine block and what you can do in case of an engine failure:

Signs of a Cracked Engine Block

These are some of the signs of trouble that tell you it’s time to get your car fixed or consider selling it:

  • You see oil in the antifreeze or the other way around
  • You burn through coolant and oil more quickly
  • Your car goes through gas faster
  • Smoke coming out from the engine is excessive
  • You hear a knocking noise from under the hood
  • The engine overheats

What Should You Do When the Car Engine Fails?

If you notice any of the signs mentioned above, it means you’ve only got a matter of time before you’ll encounter an engine failure. The problem is, most people choose to ignore these signs and just go on driving their vehicle even if that means they’re putting more oil and coolant into their suffering engine. These are the people who find themselves stuck on the side of the road because their car broke down and the tow truck takes too long to get them. If you do not want to experience that, you should take action immediately. If you wait for a car breakdown, you’re likely going to pay a higher price for a repair.

A cracked engine block or a blown head gasket might require a replacement and that can cost you an arm and a leg. Estimates depend on the make and model of your car but you are probably going to spend about $2000 for the repair of the affected engine parts. Then if you require an engine replacement the cost could go even higher. If the car doesn’t hold any sentimental value for you, you should seriously think about why you should still invest that much money in a vehicle that has blown an engine. You might want to consider getting a new car instead.

Conclusion

Even if you notice that your car is leaking coolant and oil or that it’s overheating and smoking, it’s likely that it’s too late for the car to get it in an excellent running condition. 2As you can see, the cost of repair and replacement of a blown engine caused by a cracked engine block can be too high to even be considered. It’s wiser to simply look into a new vehicle. The silver lining here is that you can sell your car even if it has engine problems. There are auto salvage yards that do pay a fair price for problematic cars.

Cash Auto Salvage buys junk cars. Contact us today or take your car to our yard to get a quote!

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About the Author

Marc
Marc

Marc is the Co-Founder of Cash Auto Salvage and Director of daily operations. He retired from a leading Internet Marketing company in 2013 and has been involved in the automotive industry ever since.

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